Travel

Spice up your holidays with these curries from around the world

Forget chicken curry from a coffee shop, here are some delicious curries you should try on your next vacation

With Deepavali around the corner, we have got spice and everything nice on our mind.

According to Booking.com, the global leader in connecting travellers with the widest choice of places to stay, here is a selection of the most tantalising curries from around the world and complementary accommodation options.

Some of the locations will be expected and others a surprise, but all will light up your life.

CURRY GOAT IN KINGSTON, JAMAICA

It used to be a special occasion meal, served at parties and every "big dance" in Jamaica. It also pops up in Caribbean areas and events all over the world.

Visitors to Kingston are spoilt for choice with award-winning restaurants, cosy eateries and street food vendors competing to produce the best curry goat.

WHERE TO STAY: Spanish Court Hotel is popular with our foodie bookers and has an on-site cafe offering local delicacies.

BRIYANI IN DHAKA, BANGLADESH

 

The origins of the briyani are hotly debated but the effect it has had on international cuisine is indisputable.

Especially popular with South Asian diasporas, today it can be eaten all over the world and to many people, Dhaka briyani is the best. From the traditional and cheap briyani in Old Dhaka to the gourmet versions in Gulshan and Banani, there is a curry for every budget and palate.

WHERE TO STAY: Hotel 71 is a great location for venturing into Dhaka's foodie quarter.

BALTI GOSHT IN BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND

 

Balti gosht is probably named after the thin steel dishes it is cooked in and possibly originates from northern Pakistan, although there is a chance it was developed in a Birmingham curry house in the 1970s.

Whatever its origin, one thing everyone can agree on is that baltis, whether lamb, beef, prawn or veggie, are delicious.

WHERE TO STAY: Saint Pauls House for its excellent location and surrounding restaurants.

SAMARACHI KODI IN GOA, INDIA

 

This seafood curry came about in Goa during monsoon season, when families were reliant on dried prawns and shrimps, rock salt, tamarind and whatever else they had in the pantry before the storms hit. The result was samarachi kodi, and it can still be found everywhere from street food stalls to restaurants.

WHERE TO STAY: Pinnacle Holiday Homes is close to the Saturday Night Market in Arpora, which features a mouth-watering selection of local food.

KAENG PHET IN BANGKOK, THAILAND

 

Kaeng phet, also known as Thai red curry, is extremely popular in Thailand. It comprises a dry red spur chilli paste cooked in coconut milk and combined with meat, seafood or protein.

WHERE TO STAY: Q Space Residence is a short drive from Bangkok's famous Or Tor Kor Market.

KARE PAN IN TOKYO, JAPAN

 

Kare pan (curry bread) is Japanese curry wrapped in dough, coated in bread crumbs and then deep-fried. In Tokyo, the streets are lined with places serving this delicacy, which is even a character in manga artist Takashi Yanase's Anpanman.

WHERE TO STAY: Staying in the Asakusa district - try the B:Conte Asakusa or Coto Tokyo Yui Asakusa - will give travellers easy access to kare pan specialists Toyofuku, which has been making this delicious snack for over a century.

GULAI AYAM IN WEST SUMATRA, INDONESIA

 

Gulai ayam is the most popular variety of gulai and is served with steamed rice or roti canai.

The thickness of the gravy, spice mix and accompanying vegetables change depending on the part of Indonesia. Gulai ayam originated from West Sumatra, and today the region has a wide selection of both traditional dishes and milder varieties for cautious tourists.

WHERE TO STAY: The Treeli Boutique Hotel is a 10-minute walk from the Jam Gadang clock tower in Bukittinggi and has a rooftop restaurant.

TourismFood & Drinkhotel