Biker Boy

Unboxing the 1,000cc Kawasaki H2

My palms began to sweat a little as I watched the four large boxes being unloaded from the lorry.

I stood there like a child waiting to tear open his presents.

But it wasn’t my birthday last Thursday.

 

 

For some lucky Singaporeans, it might as well be their birthday when their Kawasaki dealers call them to say that their H2 motorcycles are ready for collection.

For me, getting a first look at the first batch of H2 bikes up close and personal would have to suffice.

 


Technicians unbolting the metal frame that protects the H2. TNP PHOTOS: ZAIHAN MOHD YUSOF

I moved in closer as the technicians from Evershine Auto, the local Kawasaki motorcycles distributor, cut open the cardboard boxes and unbolted the H2 from its metal palette. 

While this might not be the much-talked-about supercharged H2R, which has an eye-popping 300HP and can reach a theoretical speed above 400kmh, the single-seater H2 is equally impressive.

First, it doesn’t look like your contemporary sports bike.

The street-legal H2 has less curves. It’s designed with more sharp angles and features small tunnels for air to glide over its bodywork.  


The fins and the low-drag design of the Kawasaki H2 is evident on the bike's bodywork.

I don’t know much about aerodynamics but this thing looks like it can fly given its close association with Kawasaki’s aerospace branch, which had designed the supercharger on the carbon fibre-infused  H2R.

As I pushed the 1,000cc H2 into the showroom, I noticed that it’s slightly heavier than a 600cc sports bike.

While the saddle area feels like any anorexic sports bike, the H2’s front seems a little bulky and wide.

The bike’s paintwork caught my eye because the gleaming panels may look like metal, but they’re not — they’re hand-painted to look like liquid-metal, like something out of a sci-fi movie.
 

Top of the line components used on the H2. TNP PHOTO: ZAIHAN MOHD YUSOF

Of course, the H2 comes with choice components like Brembo brakes, an Ohlins steering damper and a sticky set of rubbers.

Without a battery or fuel, we were not able to bring the H2 to life.

I guess I would have to be happy with sitting on the H2 and flipping the pages of its owner’s manual... For now.

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