Movies

Michael B Jordan and Kate Mara fend off racist and sexist comments

Another day, another awkward interview.

Last week, Paper Town's Cara Delevingne had an uncomfortable session with the hosts of Good Day Sacramento.

Now it's the cast of the upcoming Fantastic Four who recently had an interview with Atlanta's Rock 100.5 Morning Show that rivals Delevingne's on the awkwardness scale.

The host, shock jock Steven J. Rickman, known as Southside Steve, started by asking Michael B. Jordan and Kate Mara what he thought was an "obvious" question, as he plays Johnny Storm/Human Torch and she plays Susan Storm/Invisible Woman.

"From what I’ve seen you’re brother and sister," Rickman asked Jordan and Mara.

“Am I missing something? … But you’re white and you’re black. How does that happen?”

Jordan, 28, who had addressed criticisms over his casting as the Human Torch, handled the racist question tactfully.

"They could be raised as brother and sister," Jordan said of the Storm siblings, who are white in Marvel's comic books.

"There's a whole bunch of family dynamics that could be without the 'obvious adoption'."

 

 

The focus was then shifted to Mara — specifically to her hair, and her toes.

“You’re way, way hot,” Rickman remarked. “Why’d you cut the hair? Your hair was beautiful.”

“This is a great interview,” Mara responded, adding she cut her hair for another movie she filmed.

“They asked me to. I’m an actress. I have to be a chameleon.”

As if that's not awkward, things got creepier as Rickman started talking about Mara's toes, professing to be "a toe guy".

After the interview, Rickman's co-host Jason Bailey defended his partner, telling Buzzfeed: "As for him complimenting her toes and why people are upset about that…sorry…no idea.

"Steve likes girl’s toes. People should be appreciative when they get complimented. Those that are upset on Twitter I guess don’t get enough of them. Who knows?”

Source: Entertainment Weekly, E! News, Salon

movieFantastic FourKate MaraMichael B JordanUncategorisedRace & Religion