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Look: China blocks Instagram but HK protesters still posting photos and videos

Unlike Sunday evening where Hong Kong protesters clashed with riot police over their use of tear gas and pepper spray, Monday's protests were comparably more peaceful.

Riot police have stood down.

Yet, many more demonstrators have since joined the protests - considered to be the biggest challenge to Beijing since the 1989 Tiananmen protests.

But it must be noted that they have come together to take part in mostly peaceful sit-in protests and and mass sing-a longs and chanting.

Here are some of the best Instagram photos and videos from Hong Kong demonstrators.

Sunday's protests were chaotic because of the surprise use of tear gas. Below is a video of demonstrators caught off-guard by the force and run away, screaming.

 

 

 

On Monday however, protests became peaceful again with sit-in chanting and sing-a-longs.

 

Protesters have been urging Hong Kong's chief executive Leung Chun-ying to join them on the protest stage and have a dialogue with the students.

 

Even supporters of democracy need some rest. They are resting for another day of protests ahead. 

Streets and traffic continue to be blocked by the protesters and there is no sign of the protests quelling anytime soon.

 

 

 

 

 

After the umbrella became an indispensable weapon for supporters against riot police's use of tear gas and pepper spray, it quickly became the symbol of the protest with many coining it "Umbrella revolution".

 

 

While force is not longer being used, the number of protesters appears to be growing.

 

 

It was reported that supporters, after seeing police using force on unarmed students and activists, brought food, bottled water and medical equipment for the protesters. Here, supplies pile up on the sidewalks.

 

Related reports: Hong Kong police used tear gas on protesters 87 times; China blocks Instagram

                              ​HK police surprise protesters with tear gas

Source: Reuters, LA Times, Geofeedia

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