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Prosecution: Why a stiffer sentence is needed

Calling for a stiff "exemplary sentence" yesterday, Deputy Public Prosecutor Alan Loh asked for Ding to be jailed for two to three years and fined between $40,000 and $100,000 for each of his three charges.

This adds up to jail terms of four to six years, and fines of between $120,000 to $300,000. The prosecution gave these reasons for its stand:

1 PUBLIC INTEREST DEMANDS STIFF SENTENCE

The world has its eyes on Singapore, with Ding's case being reported in several foreign papers like UK's Financial Times, Bloomberg and Hong Kong's The Standard.

Singapore has also been criticised for not doing enough against match-fixing after Europol found that 150 of 380 rigged matches worldwide were done by people operating here.

Adding that it is difficult to arrest match fixers, the prosecution said: "Whenever we are able to catch a match fixer, an example must be made of him to let his comrades know that what awaits them is not a life of luxury, but years of life behind bars."

The defence, however, said what the prosecution is asking for is a "departure from benchmark sentences", citing previous cases.

"It cannot be right, Your Honour, to make Mr Ding pay for the sins of every match fixer in Singapore," Ding's lawyer, Mr Thong Chee Kun, said.

2 THE OFFENCE WAS PREMEDITATED

Ding's "persistent conduct" in pursuing former Lebanese referee Ali Sabbagh led the prosecution to conclude that Ding's offences were planned.

Ding had cultivated trust and temptation over time by sending iPhones and money to Mr Sabbagh's Lebanese colleagues.

He also had to arrange, through his conduits, for three women to be taken to Amara Hotel - where the former match officials were staying - to provide gratification for them.

3 THE ACCUSED IS NOT REMORSEFUL

Instead of cooperating with the authorities, Ding tried to slip a receipt linking him to his match-fixing syndicate in his sock during his interview with the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB), the prosecution submitted.

Referring to Ding's defence as "an entire fairy tale" spun in court, as well as the defence making "baseless allegations" against the CPIB officers, the prosecution said these factors indicated a lack of remorse.


Whenever we are able to catch a match fixer, an example must be made of him to let his comrades know that what awaits them is not a life of luxury, but years of life behind bars.

- Deputy Public Prosecutor Alan Loh