Singapore

Include e-bike awareness in Highway Code?

Motorists need to learn how to co-share the road with other users like e-bike riders.

Speaking to The New Paper yesterday, deputy chairman of the Government Parliamentary Committee for Transport Ang Hin Kee suggested that the Highway Code test should include training on how motorists can share the road with personal mobility device (PMD) users and cyclists.

He also said that apart from enforcement, we need to make sure that PMDs are equipped with features such as better lighting to improve visibility.

Mr Denis Koh, a member of the Land Transport Authority's (LTA) Active Mobility Advisory Panel, stressed that e-bikers should not cause inconvenience to other motorists.

He also said they must follow traffic rules and signal their intent early when making turns.

He told TNP that because e-bikers may be slower moving, other motorists must watch out for them and give them ample space to manoeuvre.

BLIND SPOTS

Singapore Road Safety Council chairman Bernard Tay pointed out that there are many blind spots for heavy vehicles, so there must always be a safe distance between an e-biker and them, and for that matter, cars as well.

He added: "The e-bikers are vulnerable, therefore observing their own safety is important.

"Also, these bikers should always remember to wear proper gear to protect themselves."

LTA regulations introduced last December state that every e-biker must ride as close as possible to the left side of the road.

E-bikes must also be no heavier than 20kg and have a maximum speed of 25kmh. Riding without a helmet on roads and against the flow of traffic are disallowed.

Fines for first-time offenders were raised from $100 to $300.If passed, the Active Mobility Bill, introduced in Parliament by Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan on Nov 9, will bring about harsher penalties for sellers of non-compliant e-bikes, such as those which can go faster than 25kmh.

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