Singapore

Breaking fast with a delivery rider

It was a simple move.

He liked riding his motorcycle so taking a job as a delivery rider made sense.

Just two months into the job, Mr Nur Hakim Said, 21, has discovered a unexpected challenge, fasting during the month of Ramadan.

Fasting in Singapore typically lasts for 14 hours.

The New Paper followed Mr Hakim for a day on Saturday (June 26) as he made his deliveries for Deliveroo.

The youngest of four siblings, he works six days a week, often starting at 11am.

"I was introduced to the job by my friends who enjoy riding as much as I do. I also want to earn my own money so that I can ease my parents' burden," he said.

It will not come as a surprise that lunchtime is a busy period. It only slows down around 2pm.

By 5pm, Mr Hakim - who is currently waiting for enlistment to National Service - already had three orders in hand.

Under the hot sun, the back of his shirt was drenched with sweat as he set off from Maude Road to Middle Road on his black DRZ bike to collect an order.

Mr Hakim said: "The biggest challenge for me is definitely the weather. It's so hot these days and I get very thirsty easily. It took me quite a while to adjust to it."

Coincidentally, the customer the food order was for was waiting to iftar (break fast).

"I take it upon myself to reach them as soon as possible so that they can break fast on time," said Mr Hakim.

He added that some customers have offered him drinks and snacks if he reaches them around break fast time.

It was almost 7.15pm when Mr Hakim had finished his delivery, so he stopped by a petrol station to buy drinks and some bread to break fast.

He took 10 minutes to eat before resuming with his orders.

At 8pm, he called it a day and sat for a meal at a coffee shop.

Mr Hakim said: "Being a delivery rider is not as easy as people think. It can be physically demanding and requires a lot of endurance, especially during Ramadan."

RamadanfastingDELIVEROOmotorcycleIFTARBREAKING FAST