Singapore

More bollards to be used at events as security measure

Concrete bollards may be increasingly used at public events in Singapore as security is heightened after terror attacks overseas.

Replying to a question in Parliament last month, Mr Desmond Lee, Second Minister for Home Affairs, said the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) is reviewing security measures in public spaces, "in particular against hostile vehicle attacks".

Possible new measures include putting up bollards or security barriers.

The attack in Barcelona last Thursday and another in a nearby town the next day are the latest in which terrorists used vehicles to ram into pedestrians.

Fifteen people were killed in those cases.

Some 130 people have died in such attacks in Europe since July last year, when a man driving a truck killed 86 people in Nice, France.

S-Lite, a local event logistics company, has been stocking up on bollards because of increased demand since last year.

Mr Vernon Ang, 29, its operations director, said: "In the past, public events did not usually require concrete bollards, but as it gets worse overseas, the tension and security levels in Singapore increase too."

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S-Lite supplies bollards for large-scale outdoor events, including public runs.

Mr Randy Tan, 35, general manager of Infinitus Productions, which organises events such as the JP Morgan Corporate Challenge run, said: "We have had requests from the Singapore Police Force to use concrete bollards for our events with road closures since April this year."

Bollards were also set up at the Marina Bay Sands waterfront, The Promontory @ Marina Bay and near The Fullerton Hotel for the National Day Parade fireworks on Aug 9.

Separately, MHA said an Infrastructure Protection Act will be introduced later this year to better protect critical infrastructure and large-scale developments.

The ministry will also release an updated version of the Guidelines for Enhancing Building Security in Singapore to ensure the security of buildings and public spaces.

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