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A small Brazilian town is run by girls. No men allowed except for weekends

Who run the world? Girls, according to Queen Bey.

It might not exactly be the world, but girls are certainly running things at a small town in Brazil.

Only women have populated the town of Noiva do Cordeiro since the 1995 death of a pastor who imposed strict rules like banning women from drinking and cutting their hair.

After his death, the women decided never again to let a man dictate their lives.

Some of Noiva de Cordeiro's 600 women are already married and have families. But their husbands are forced to work away from home and only return to their wives' hometown during the weekends.

Once their sons turn 18, they will be forced out of the town too.

Here, girls take charge of everything - from farming to town planning.

Rosalee Fernandes, 49, a resident in the town said: "There are lots of things that women do better than men. Our town is prettier, more organised, and far more harmonious than if men were in charge.

"When problems or disputes arise, we resolve them in a woman's way, trying to find consensus rather than conflict."

Everything appears to be fine and dandy in this town.

After all, according to Fernandes, "there's always time to stop and gossip, try on each other's clothes and do each other's hair and nails."

Isn't that a dream come true, ladies?

Just one thing missing: Men

Because the town is only populated by women, they are missing one important thing: Men.

Nelma Fernandes, 23, said: "We all dream of falling in love and getting married. But we like living here and don't want to have to leave the town to find a husband."

The men that they do meet are either their relatives or are already married.

So they came up with a solution: These women are extending an invitation to potential suitors. 

But before you start packing your bags, these women expect the men to live by their rules.

This means they can only spend weekends at Noiva do Cordeiro.

Any men interested?

Source: Mail Online

 

 

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