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WHAT IS HAEMOPHILIA AND HOW CAN IT BE TREATED?

Haemophilia is a rare inherited blood disorder in which the blood does not clot properly.

People with haemophilia do not bleed any faster than normal, but they can bleed for a longer time. About 1 in 10,000 people is born with it.


TYPES OF HAEMOPHILIA:

Haemophilia A is the most common. It is when the person does not have enough clotting Factor VIII.

Haemophilia B is less common. A person with haemophilia B does not have enough Factor IX and the result is the same, they bleed for a longer time than normal.

Haemophilia with inhibitors is when complications set in. The person's immune system reacts to proteins in factor concentrates, treating them as if they are harmful foreign substances. When this happens, antibodies form in the blood to fight against the factor proteins, stopping them from fixing the bleeds.


Signs:

  • Big bruises
  • Bleeding into muscles and joints
  • Spontaneous or sudden bleeding
  • Prolonged bleeding


Treatment:

The missing clotting factor, be it Factor VIII or Factor IX, is injected into the bloodstream. The bleeding stops when enough clotting factor reaches the spot that is bleeding.

For haemophilia with inhibitors, drugs called bypassing agents are used to work around antibodies and help blood clot.


SOURCE: WORLD FEDERATION OF HAEMOPHILIA

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