World

Hong Kong's chief executive's spoilt-brat daughter?

Ms Leung Chai Yan, eldest daughter of Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun Ying is facing intense public scrutiny, after footage of her slapping her mother twice emerged.

According to SCMP, the incident took place at around 3am on Sunday (Nov 1), in the Hong Kong party district of Lan Kwai Fong.

From her Instagram, it seemed that Ms Leung, 24, was at a Halloween party and was dressed in a long, white Halloween attire with ghoulish make-up.

The video showed Ms Leung emerging from a nightclub, escorted by a man in black shirt, who pulled her to a waiting taxi.

 

 

She kept repeating "No. Just go, just go" and asked "Where is she?", possibly referring to her mother, Madam Regina Tong.

Some burly men managed to force her into the taxi, trying to stop the confrontation.

However, when Madam Tong tried to get into the taxi, Ms Leung slapped her.

Putting her hand on her cheek, the startled Madam Tong tried to step in to the taxi again and was slapped once more.

This time, Ms Leung told the crowd gathered around the taxi: "You know this mum is not my biological mother."

In the end, Ms Leung left in the taxi with the man in black shirt, who tried to cover his face, leaving Madam Tong behind.

Ms Leung, who is a law student at the London School of Economics and Political Science, is no stranger to Internet controversies, and seems to love posting them on her Facebook and Instagram, which are surprisingly still open to public.

Here are other instances when she has been the talk of the talk for all the wrong reasons.

1. Posting self-harm photos

 

 

A photo posted by(@leung.chai.yan) on Oct 8, 2015 at 2:01am PDT

 

According to Coconuts Hong Kong, in June 2014, Ms Leung had posted two photos of self-harm on her Facebook page - one of a slashed wrist in bloody bath water with the caption "Will I bleed to death?" and another of a bloody hand with the caption "I love blood".

The photos speculated about her alleged depression.

The photos were removed from her account within a few hours and Hong Kong media outlets soon published photographs of Ms Leung sitting on a park bench with her parents, her wrists concealed under long sleeves.

2. Public criticism of her mother

On July 27 2014, Ms Leung posted a status on Facebook saying that: "Courage and loyalty are the virtues I value the most. My mother embodies the exact opposites of both."

There was no reference as to what provoked her to post the status.

Ironically, just before that scathing post, she had posted an old family photograph with the caption "found this little gem #throwback #childhood #family #parents #holiday #france #europe #1998?".

How quickly things change.

3. Claiming that all her "beautiful shoes and dresses and clutches" were funded by Hong Kong taxpayers

Responding to comments on her necklace in her profile picture on Facebook, Ms Leung posted a Facebook status which infuriated many Hong Kong citizens.

In the status, she wrote: "This is actually a beautiful necklace bought at Lane Crawford (yes- funded by all you HK taxpayers!! So are all my beautiful shoes and dresses and clutches!! Thank you so much!!!)"

 

4. Vows to leave home

Her most recent controversy, prior to the slapping incident yesterday, was in March this year.

According to The Straits Times, Ms Leung posted several distraught Facebook updates, accusing her mother of attacking her and said she was "leaving home forever" .

In the post, she wrote that her mother pushed her against a wall, slapped her and verbally abused her.

She fell when her mother kicked her, and hit her spine against the corner of her study table.

She then called her mother "deranged" who "has issues" and said that she had tried to help her.

 

 

"From this day onwards, I'm leaving home forever. Never coming back."

She also claimed that she was being held against her will and is not able to receive medical treatment like a normal Hong Kong citizen.

The posts above have since been deleted.

 

SOURCES: SCMP, COCONUT HONG KONG, THE STRAITS TIMES

hong kongUncategorisedmother