Hart in for a hard time

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'We're stronger than last season'

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COMMUNITY SHIELD

Man City still the team to beat

WE BUILT THIS CITY: With the likes of Stevan Jovetic, Joe Hart, Yaya Toure (above) and Samir Nasri in their ranks, City remain favourites for the title.
WE BUILT THIS CITY: With the likes of Stevan Jovetic (above), Joe Hart, Yaya Toure and Samir Nasri in their ranks, City remain favourites for the title.
WE BUILT THIS CITY: With the likes of Stevan Jovetic, Joe Hart (above), Yaya Toure and Samir Nasri in their ranks, City remain favourites for the title.
WE BUILT THIS CITY: With the likes of Stevan Jovetic, Joe Hart, Yaya Toure and Samir Nasri (above) in their ranks, City remain favourites for the title.

For a club with chaos imbedded in its DNA, this has been a strangely sedate summer for Manchester City. 

But then, much has changed in the blue half of the city since the epochal takeover of 2008. 

For one thing, City are currently champions for the second time in the Premier League era. 

For another, they are Champions League regulars, preparing for their fourth successive campaign.
 
But their season begins today with a scuffle for a rather more low-key trophy — the Community Shield. 

Nothing will be settled today in terms of major honours. 

We have seen countless times that this curtain-raiser can be a false barometer for the coming season. 

But, with their strength in depth, the Citizens are still the team to beat.

Read the full report in our print edition on Aug 10. Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

Tags: city, team and beat

PEOPLE

Getting the world grooving

Dance used in good causes to support bladder leakage sufferers and ballet-lovin' tsunami victims

OUTDOOR FUN: Dancers from the Australian Ballet practising their moves.
OUTDOOR FUN: Participants of the Drop Your Pants and Dance for Underwareness campaign which is seeking to help support the 65 million Americans who experience bladder leakage.
FOR A GOOD CAUSE:Ms Dorothree Gilbert of the Paris Opera giving a lesson to dance students in Japan's Fukushima.
EYE-CATCHING: A photo, taken with multiple exposures, of South African dancer Gregory Maqoma strutting his stuff.
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Definitively football

Alternative meanings of popular terms starring S.League players

Kwon Dak Yung of Home United FC.
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Made in S'pore...and proud of it

FAMILY AFFAIR: (Above, from left) Ms Nelly Tay, Mr Johnson Tay, Ms Evan Tay and Mr Ken Tay of SMH Food.
FAMILY AFFAIR: Making some of SMH Food's products.
FAMILY AFFAIR: Making some of SMH Food's products.

One borrowed the trend of bikini waxes from New York, did so well, that they are exporting the services back to the US city.

Another had their big break when outbreaks of swine flu and bird flu elsewhere made Singapore's food products a safe choice, and yet another had live crocs in its arsenal of marketing tools.

Such are the anecdotes from local brands which have made it big in the world. This National Day, find out what goes into Made in Singapore companies.

Read the full report in our print edition on Aug 10. Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop

Tags: made, Singapore and brands

STRIP, BROWHAUS - She tackles 'overgrown bushes' problem

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CROCODILE - Proud to be 'made in S'pore'

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Other home-grown global brands

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What does it mean to be Singaporean?

Local project asks people to think about national pride on a personal level

PRIDE: Track and field legend C Kunalan.
PRIDE: Track and field legend C Kunalan.
PRIDE: Writer Wong Shu Yun.
PRIDE: Writer Wong Shu Yun.
ROJAK: Student Jessica Tan.
ROJAK: Student Jessica Tan.
ROJAK: Singer-songwriter Dick Lee.
ROJAK: Singer-songwriter Dick Lee.

Mr Lim Meng Jin's photography project, which prompts Singaporeans to think about what it means to belong to this country, began as a response to the negativity he noticed.

"I wanted to get people to think about both tangible and intangible things that contribute to why it means something to be Singaporean.

Armed with a whiteboard, he approached Singaporeans who made an impact in his life as well as the local landscape, to pen their answers done.

Photos of them and their answers are then uploaded on his Facebook page, We the Citizens.

Read the full report in our print edition (Aug 10).Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop

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