Man up...

Dr Daniel Gan, 
a family physician with a special interest in men's health

Dr Daniel Gan, a family physician with a special interest in men’s health
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Sharing a sacred craft

Japanese master performer gives S'poreans behind-the-scenes glimpse of traditional dance

The stage is pitch black save for the spot where Mr Akifusa performs.
THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: Mr Akifusa preparing his make-up.
THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: The band he ties around his forehead is to keep his hair in place. It also pulls back the skin on his face so he looks more feminine.
THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: With the help of a translator in the background, Mr Akifusa explains every step he takes for the transformation.
THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: Mr Akifusa needs full concentration while doing his make-up. He even requests that the audience remain silent when putting on his eyeshadow.
1 2 3 THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: 1. Mr Akifusa preparing his 
make-up. 2. The band he ties around his forehead is to keep his hair in place. It also pulls back the skin on his face so he looks more feminine. 3. With the help of a translator in the background, Mr Akifusa explains every step he takes for the transformation. 4. Mr Akifusa needs full concentration while doing his make-up. He even requests that the audience remain silent when putting on his eyeshadow. 5. While putting on his kimono, he explains that the layers of cloth worn by a woman correspond to her wealth. 6. Mr Akifusa adjusts his wig as he completes his transformation. 7. Mr Akifusa speaks to members of the audience after his performance. Some members of the audience turned up in kimonos. DRAMATIC: The stage is pitch black save for the spot where Mr Akifusa performs. 4 5 6 7
THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: Mr Akifusa adjusts his wig as he completes his transformation.
THE MAN-TO-WOMAN TRANSFORMATION: Mr Akifusa speaks to members of the audience after his performance. Some members of the audience turned up in kimonos.
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Younis eyes another 
fairytale 
finish

TALISMAN: Younis Mahmoud celebrating after scoring against Iran (above) and lifting the Asian Cup trophy in 2007.
TALISMAN: Younis Mahmoud celebrating after scoring against Iran and lifting the Asian Cup trophy in 2007 (above).
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Malaysia flicks Japan out

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Stewards' cup at able friend's mercy

"Made a host of top-notch performers look clearly second-rate when coasting to an easy victory in last month’s HK Mile. He’s clearly the one to beat in the Group 1 The Stewards’ Cup." - Phillip Woo, on Able Friend (right) in Race 8 today
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New hand, renewed life

Company makes 3D hand for girl, 7, after watching viral video of her

HAPPY: With the help of her mechanical hand, Ainaa Amanda Shahzali will be able to perform simple tasks. She has been able to adapt to the hand quickly, according to her mother.
HAPPY: With the help of her mechanical hand, Ainaa Amanda Shahzali will be able to perform simple tasks. She has been able to adapt to the hand quickly, according to her mother.
HAPPY: With the help of her mechanical hand, Ainaa Amanda Shahzali will be able to perform simple tasks. She has been able to adapt to the hand quickly, according to her mother.
HAPPY: With the help of her mechanical hand, Ainaa Amanda Shahzali will be able to perform simple tasks. She has been able to adapt to the hand quickly, according to her mother.
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Boro floor Man City in FA Cup shocker

GOAL HERO: Patrick Bamford (above) is delirious after opening the scoring against the Premier League champions.



What temerity, what guts, what a performance.

Championship side Middlesbrough did the unthinkable in the den of the English Premier League champions.

In an FA Cup fourth-round tie at the Etihad Stadium this morning (Singapore time), they dished out a 2-0 humiliation through goals by Patrick Bamford and Garcia Kike to knock Manchester City out of the competition.

At the final whistle, an air of disbelief permeated around the ground, replacing the aura of invincibility that has gained a foothold there in recent years.

The mighty have fallen.

Read the full report in our print edition on Jan 25. Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

 

Top local field for prestige event

Ms Doris Khaw.
SPGA president M. Murugiah.
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Singapore, get behind our 100m sprinters at June's SEA Games

CHASE FOR GLORY: He won silver in the 100m at the 2011 SEA Games and Gary Yeo (left) believes this year's event on home soil would be extra special.

There is pindrop silence, as a deathly quiet envelopes the arena.

Bodies of spectators stay ramrod stiff, with many craning their necks.

Automatically, all other events in the stadium come to a stop.

The world waits, a packed stadium anticipates, the eight protagonists do knee-lifts and simply stare at the finish, knowing that milliseconds could decide positions.
Why?

Because it is the blue riband event of any Games, and in a little over 10 seconds or less, after some 42 strides the fastest man in the world, continent or region will be decided.

Come June, our spanking new National Stadium will stage this scene.

And a South-east Asia (SEA) Games sprint king will be crowned

After 22 years, Singaporeans will get to witness the SEA Games men’s 100 metres final on home turf, and The New Paper's consulting editor Godfrey Robert urges local fans to flood the National Stadium and electrify the atmosphere, to give our challengers a boost as they look to win glory.

Read the full report in our print edition on Jan 25. Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

 

'We need less things'

US billionaire who owns mansions, private jet says:

HE HAS COME A LONG WAY: Billionaire Jeff Greene was a bus boy and waiter during his college days.
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