Stranger in queue pays for poor mum's diapers

Katie Kanefke has to scrimp and save to raise her four-month-old son. Every little bit counts.

Her husband, Jimmy, is the sole breadwinner and they live on a tight budget.

On Sunday, she placed four diaper packs in her shopping cart, thinking she would get a discounted price. She didn't.

The Walmart cashier in South Dakota declined to match a competitor's lower price on the item, so Ms Kanefke decided to buy only one pack.

This would have ended as a sad tale for the young mother if not for a startling act of kindness.

Ms Carol Flynn, 73, who had been waiting in line to pay for her items, forked out US$120 (S$150) to pay for the diapers.

The kind deed was secretly filmed by another shopper Jason Yoshino, who put it up on his Facebook page that very night. 

The video has since gone viral, garnering 29,000 likes and 7,400 shares.

On the touching act, Mail Online reported Ms Kanefke as saying: "I couldn't believe it. I was shocked. I kept saying thank you and God bless you."

"'Then I walked out in the parking lot and started crying," she said.

Ms Flynn, however, didn't think too much of her pay-it-forward action.

Argus Leader reported Ms Flynn as saying: "I just think we should do things like that. That's kind of my thinking."

She told ABC News: "Diapers are for babies and babies are on my heart. We’re always concerned about mums and healthy babies."

 Mr Yoshino said on his Facebook status when posting the video:  "My wife and I were speechless at this warm hearted and kind act of generosity. There are some amazing people in this world. What a way to end such a beautiful day to witness such an amazing act of kindness." 

Watch the video here.

Sources: ABC News, Argus Leader, Mail Online

Obama calls Howard and Dempsey to congratulate US team

 US President Barack Obama (centre) calls a foul on the Belgians as he takes a seat for a few minutes to watch during a staff viewing party of the World Cup soccer match between the US and Belgium on July 1, 2014.
US President Barack Obama (centre) calls a foul on the Belgians as he takes a seat for a few minutes to watch during a staff viewing party of the World Cup soccer match between the US and Belgium on July 1, 2014.
 US President Barack Obama reacts as he watches the World Cup soccer match between the US and Belgium during a staff viewing party on July 1, 2014.
US President Barack Obama reacts as he watches the World Cup soccer match between the US and Belgium during a staff viewing party on July 1, 2014.

The US national football team's Tim Howard and Clint Dempsey got a call from none other than the US President, congratulating them on their World Cup performance

“Man, I just wanted to call and say you guys did us proud!” President Barack Obama says in the call which was posted on the White House YouTube channel.

“You guys did great….you guys captured the hearts and imaginations of the whole country.”

Millions of Americans have tuned into this World Cup, with the USA-Portugal group match drawing 18.22 million viewers on ESPN, according to the New York Post.

Team USA were beaten 2-1 in extra-time by Belgium in the round of 16, despite the valiant efforts of US captain Howard and striker Dempsey.

Howard was deemed the new Captain America after his World Cup record of 16 saves​ in that match, with fans hailing his incredible performance, with visuals like this:

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel also called Howard "to thank him for defending the United States of America at the World Cup."

Twitter said US-Belgium ranked as the fourth-most tweeted World Cup match, with 9.1 million tweets.

Source: Whitehouse YouTube, Twitter, New York Post

How cool is this bird? It serves at Wimbledon

Rufus the Hawk.
Rufus the Hawk.

Rufus the Hawk reports for duty weighing one pound, six ounces.

An ounce or two more, and he’s too sedentary. Any lighter, and he ceases being the non-lethal deterrent Wimbledon contracts him to be and roams farther afield for mouse, snake or hare.

But if Rufus arrives at his optimum weight, he need only soar over Center Court a few times to earn his hand-fed reward of raw chicken bits. The mere sight of his 40-inch wingspan is enough to shoo away the pigeons that might otherwise land on the court during a critical point, deposit droppings in the Royal Box or roost in the eaves to feast on grass-seed all winter, as if the sod were a buffet table.

A 6-year-old Harris Hawk with prodigious self-esteem, Rufus is just one of several hundred actors in the meticulously choreographed dance that unfolds between dawn and 10:30 a.m. daily throughout the Wimbledon fortnight.

 

 


Photos: Stella Artois UK/YouTube

Other "actors" in Wimbledon perfection

From strawberry-hullers to bomb-sniffing English Springer Spaniels, every man and beast has a task before the All England Club’s wrought-iron gates open to the tennis-mad public. And every task – whether mowing, measuring, marking, pruning, watering, soaring, sniffing, sweeping, scrubbing or polishing – has its appointed time for completion.

No detail is overlooked. Everything must be just so at the most esteemed of the four Grand Slams. A ticket to Wimbledon, after all, constitutes an invitation to a private club that opens to royals and commoners alike for two weeks each year to watch the world’s best players in the most pristine setting in sports.

“It’s all about the details,” says Lucy Tomlinson, 21, a member of Wimbledon’s daytime housekeeping staff, which from 7:30 a.m. onward restocks the loos with soap and hand towels, polishes the banisters, scrubs scuff marks from the entryways and wipes away beads of water left by the power-washing of ticket-holders’ seats.

“We make sure everything is absolute perfection!”

Neil Stubley, the head groundsman, starts his day with a 5:30 a.m. check of the forecast. Based on that, he directs his staff when to deflate the translucent covers on the 41 grass courts so they can be rolled up and stowed and the sod watered if the daily measurements of its hardness indicate there’s a need.

All of Wimbledon’s courts are oriented in a north-south direction. A specific groundskeeper is assigned to each court for the tournament’s duration. And each mows the rye grass to precisely 8 millimeters each morning, in exactly the same pattern of alternating stripes.

Every cutting is captured by the mower; even a stray snippet of grass could cause a player to slip.


Photos: Wimbledon/YouTube

“If Roger or Andy or Rafa goes out onto any of the practice courts in the morning and then comes out to any of the match courts, they should play exactly the same because we have controlled the moisture, the grass species and the cutting,” explains Stubley, who supervises a staff of 32 groundskeepers and gardeners.

Rufus doesn't like dogs

A mix of spaniels and retrievers, they scamper up and down the walkways, peer under benches and poke into trash bins positively quivering with excitement over the prospect of finding something that warrants a prize. At Wimbledon, naturally, that prize is a fuzzy yellow tennis ball.

Dogs, however, are one of the few sights that unsettle Rufus. So handler Imogen Davis, whose parents and five siblings breed and train raptors for a living, does her best to steer the hawk clear of Wimbledon’s canines. It’s not always easy, given that Rufus’s vision is 10 times better than her own.

“If Rufus was at one end of a football pitch, and a newspaper was at the other end, Rufus could read the headline!” Davis says by way of illustration. “If he could read.”

Apart from the sight of dogs, nothing rattles Rufus. Not the sound of Wimbledon’s lawn mowers. Not the sound of leaf blowers. Not even the fire alarm that gets a full-song test each morning at 9:35.

It’s followed at 9:45 a.m. by a call over the public-address system for all staff and contractors to remove all vehicles and carts from the grounds in preparation for the opening of the gates, 45 minutes away.

And the pace of activity picks up.

- Washington Post 

Sources: YouTube, Wimbledon, Stella Artois

 

Plain-living hermit found dead was millionaire

The 79-year-old recluse found dead last week had US$3 million (S$3.74 million) in the bank but lived without running water.
The 79-year-old recluse found dead last week had US$3 million (S$3.74 million) in the bank but lived without running water.

The 79-year-old man lived alone in a rundown shack in rural New York without running water or heat.

Mr George Konnight, who was found dead last Friday, had never been to the dentist nor did he have a telephone at home. 

But it turns out that the modest hermit was a millionaire, with US$3 million (S$3.74 million) in the bank from a sale of family land last November, reported The Journal News.

Mr Konnight had lived alone since both his sisters died in the last two years.

A distant cousin, Ms Beverly Moore, 75, said: "They didn't have many friends or even a telephone."

"I used to get calls asking about them. I told the caller they had to mail them a letter."

The coroner's office will determine the cause of Mr Konnight's death, but the death is not considered suspicious. 

Lived like recluses

A neighbour said that the two lived like recluses and never had real jobs, reported Daily Mail.

They had no expenses other than taxes, and would sell land passed down in the family to pay them. 

Mr Konnight's lawyer Thomas O'Connell had known his client for about 15 years ago and said he had been making strides in living a normal life after the death of his "domineering" sister last year. 

His money will be donated to charity.

Sources: The Journal News, Daily Mail

From 34GG to 34D: Smaller boobs preferred

Smaller boobs, better tennis career?
Smaller boobs, better tennis career?
Smaller boobs, better tennis career?
Smaller boobs, better tennis career?

For this tennis star, bigger boobs are out.

In 2009, Romanian tennis star Simona Halep went from 34DD to 34C. The move saved her career, reported Australian news site news.com.au.

Post-surgery, her increased mobility and confidence saw the 22-year-old climbing to No. 4 in the world.

Bust sizes today are particularly large.

In the 1950s, the average cup-size was a B. Today it is DD. Last month the largest-ever strapless bra, a 50L, went on the market, reported British newspaper Mail Online.

Embarrassing to do sports

Healthcare manager Jennie Smith hated her 34GG bustline so much, she went for breast reduction surgery.

Now, the 35-year-old runs, goes horse-riding and bounces on the trampoline with her daughter, 5.

She went from 34GG to 34D

PHOTO: Mail Online

She told Mail Online: "I was a size 34GG and found anything sporty extremely embarrassing... I suffered from back and neck pain and my underwired bras dug into my skin."

In the UK, the number of women undergoing mammaplasty last year increased 11 per cent from the year before to 4,680, the Mail Online reported. And over 20,000 procedures were carried out between 2006 and 2011, with some girls as young as 15. 

Sources: Mail Online, news.com.au

 

Tags: breast, 34GG and tennis

Beckham sizzles in new H&M photoshoot

David Beckham posing for his new collection at H&M.
David Beckham posing for his new collection at H&M.
David Beckham posing for his new collection at H&M.
David Beckham posing for his new collection at H&M.

David Beckham is at it once again.

In new ads for fashion brand H&M, the 39-year-old is featured in very, very tight underwear and lounge wear with ridiculously sexy stubble and hair so amazing you could cry.

David Beckham definitely has proven (not like we doubted or anything) that even after retiring from playing professional soccer, he still keeps his physique in tip top shape.

I'm just going to put it out there and say that I foresee H&M's sales spiking for a while.

I shall stop writing and let the video and photos do the talking now.

Okay bye!