Previous scams

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Protect yourself

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Crossing the line

Scammer uses messaging app Line to dupe man into buying iTunes gift cards

CON JOB: Screenshots of the conversation between Mr Koh Mui Quee and the scammer, who posed as his friend, Mr Tang.
CON JOB: Screenshots of the conversation between Mr Koh Mui Quee and the scammer, who posed as his friend, Mr Tang.
CON JOB: Screenshots of the conversation between Mr Koh Mui Quee and the scammer, who posed as his friend, Mr Tang.
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Hubby: Inappropriate men? No bother to me

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Belly-dance champ: Dance saved me from depression

Hit with post-natal depression in a foreign land, she finds her feet again in belly dancing

STRENGTH: Madam Susan Shu's parents previously discouraged her passion for dance, but she got back her confidence after picking up belly dancing.
HAPPY: Madam Susan Shu with her sons, seven and one.

She found it hard adapting to a new country, with no friends or family here except her Singaporean husband.

After Madam Susan Shu - who moved here from China in 2006 after her marriage - gave birth to her first child a year later, things got worse when she had post-natal depression.

But the 36-year-old found an outlet in belly dancing. Her passion soon inspired her to teach the dance and start her own troupe called Shakiya.

At the recent Asia Global Bellydance 2014 at Far East Plaza, Madam Shu and Shakiya won their respective categories.

Read the full report in our print edition on July 31. Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

Nursing is a lifetime of commitment, compassion

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SHE CARES FOR THE DYING

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Getting personal with patients

PASSIONATE: Mr Michael Ayeni was a midfielder before leaving for the US to study nursing (above).
PASSIONATE: Mr Michael Ayeni was a midfielder (above) before leaving for the US to study nursing.
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Coroner's finding on elderly woman's death: Oxygen tank was not turned on

Coroner's inquiry into death of 83-year-old woman during hospital transfer

1: At 6.40pm, a three-person Mount E Novena transfer team prepares to transfer Madam Ramasamy Krishnama from TTSH to Mount E. The nurses prepare a portable ventilator and oxygen tank. They put the elderly patient on a gurney and place her on the paraPAC portable ventilator. The team hears a hissing sound, which they take to mean that the oxygen supply to the ventilator is switched on.
2: Upon application of the ventilator, Madam Krishnama's vital signs did not show on the monitor and she rapidly becomes unresponsive.
3: The transfer team checks all the connections and monitor. About four minutes later, one of the nurses discovers the oxygen switch on the portable oxygen tank used to supply the paraPAC portable ventilator is off, and turns it on. Madam Krishnama does not respond.
4: The TTSH team examines Madam Krishnama and decides she is no longer fit for transfer. At 7.47pm, she is transferred back to a TTSH bed. During the transfer from the gurney to the bed, she collapses and could not be resuscitated. Madam Krishnama is pronounced dead at 9.55pm.

It was a basic task - ensuring their patients had oxygen to breathe while she was being transferred from one hospital to another.

But when the medical team heard a hissing sound, they mistook it to mean that the ventilator was already switched on.

That mistake lead to the death of Madam Ramasamy Krishnama, 83, who suffered hypoxic brain injury, which occurs when insufficient oxygen gets to the brain, in July last year.

Yesterday, State Coroner Marvin Bay questioned whether there were sufficient safeguard procedures in place during the transfer, where the roles of the medical team are critical.

He also called for a review of protocols when transferring a patient from one hospital to another.

Madam Krishnama's son told The New Paper yesterday that his mother's death had been a shock to all of them.

"All we wanted was for her to come back (from the hospital) safe and sound," he added.

Parkway Shenton, which was handling the transfer and is part of the healthcare chain with Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital and Gleneagles Hospital, said it is "deeply sorry for the family's loss" and is taking a very serious view of the incident and has since reviewed and revised its protocols that address the relevant issues.

Read the full report in our print edition on Thursday (July 31). Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

17 dead in monsoon landslide

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