White hot summer

Soak yourself in the coolest colour for the hottest season

White is always a summer favourite.

And this season, the colour gets taken to a whole new level of detail and sophistication - through the use of gorgeous textures and fabric treatments.

It is no longer just simple cotton shirting or jersey fabric.

Dressing up from head to toe in all-white outfits is huge this summer, and fashion houses are already rolling out all kinds of looks.

Keeping it white also makes it easy to ride out the heat waves - there is always something about the colour that feels so light and refreshing.

Bonus: Minimum accessories required.


(picture above, L to R)

Lacy sequinned top with camisole and laced-up shorts from Juicy Couture. Shades from Prada

Concealed button double-breasted blazer and shorts from H&M.

Box pleated flare top and mini square cut-out shorts from H&M.

Pantsuit from Alice + Olivia. Sun hat from StyleLoft3 @ Mandarin Gallery. Shades from Prada.

Boxy top with translucent detail from COS and structured thick tulle skirt from StyleLoft3 @ Mandarin Gallery.

Long-sleeved tee from American Vintage. Jeans from H&M. Shades from Ray-Ban.


Photography: Jet & Seto

Styling: Kovit Ang

Hair and make-up: Sha Shamsi using Shu Uemura and Sebastian

Professional models: Ariela O., DominiKa P. and Diego F. from Diva models

Special thanks to Wanderlust Hotel for the location and kind assistance

Cage arrives, but cat missing

Feline mystery on Malaysian Airlines flight

GONE: The cat, named Princess, allegedly went missing after being checked in for a flight from Jeddah to Kl.
Premium content not available

Businessman gets apology

Airport dress code furore

TROUBLE: The baggage reclamation area in KLIA.
Premium content not available

'He told me to go and that he loved me'

Woman recounts fiance using his body to shield her from gunman

AFTERMATH: Lifeguards and medics with a body at a Tunisian beach resort after Friday's terror attack.
Premium content not available

Suspect in French attack a 'wolf in sheep's clothing'

VICTIM: Mr Herve Cornara was beheaded.
Premium content not available

Turning up the heat

Taiwanese pop diva Jolin Tsai steals the show at Golden Melody Awards red carpet

EYE-CATCHING: (Above) Taiwanese singer Jolin Tsai, her ex-boyfriend Jay Chou, Hong Kong singer-actress Karen Mok and Singapore singer JJ Lin.
EYE-CATCHING: Taiwanese singer Jolin Tsai, her ex-boyfriend Jay Chou (abobe), Hong Kong singer-actress Karen Mok and Singapore singer JJ Lin.
EYE-CATCHING: Taiwanese singer Jolin Tsai, her ex-boyfriend Jay Chou, (above) Hong Kong singer-actress Karen Mok and Singapore singer JJ Lin.
EYE-CATCHING: Taiwanese singer Jolin Tsai, her ex-boyfriend Jay Chou, Hong Kong singer-actress Karen Mok and (above) Singapore singer JJ Lin.

One can always count on Jolin Tsai to make headlines and turn heads.

Just last month, the 34-year-old Taiwanese pop diva had the Internet abuzz with her controversial song, We're All Different, Yet The Same, with its music video featuring her locking lips with actress Ruby Lin in a wedding setting.

The video is banned in Singapore.

Last night, Tsai stole the show again at the 2015 Golden Melody Awards red carpet.

Held at the Taipei Arena, the glitzy music extravaganza is often regarded as the Grammys of Mandopop.

Tsai was decked out in a sparkly, shimmering black cleavage-baring gown, which was topped off with her voluminous blonde locks and glam red lips. Unsurprisingly, she glowed vibrantly as she posed for cameras.

SEXIEST

On popular microblogging platform Sina Weibo (China's equivalent of Twitter), netizens unanimously handed Tsai the unofficial title of "Sexiest Female Star on Golden Melody's Red Carpet".

Some called her a "beautiful goddess", while others cheekily referred to her as a spitting image of Lin, her onscreen partner in We're All Different, Yet The Same.

Tsai's ex-boyfriend, superstar Jay Chou, sent the crowd into a frenzy the minute he appeared on the red carpet.

Looking spiffy in a fedora and trendy floral jacket, the 36-year-old father-to-be - his wife, model-actress Hannah Quinlivan, 21, is pregnant - smiled when the hosts teased him: "So far, you've written two hit numbers, Listen To Mum's Words and Listen To Father's Words. When will we have a song, Listen To Hannah's Words, from you?"

Chou replied in his usual nonchalant style: "It'll come when I have feel like (penning) it."

Other red carpet standouts included home boy JJ Lin, 34, who boasted a handsome new short crop, and Hong Kong singer-actress Karen Mok.

Mok was elegant and sophisticated in her turquoise dress, which showed off her long slim legs.

The 45-year-old was a charmer during the red carpet interview, sharing with the hosts that she had an odd dream last night "about Jay Chou buying a new house".

She then added that her ultimate dream would be to "do a musical, one where I can sing, dance and act".

Are exotic meats sold here tasty?

Turtle or dog on the menu may repulse and even anger some people. But these 'exotic' meats are common fare to those who eat them. 
What makes a dish acceptable?

The ingredients for stewed crocodile paw at Old Geylang
A live octopus, imported from Korea, that will be chopped for the dish of Sannakji
FLASH-FRIED: The Fallopian tubes at Old Mother Hen Seafood Restaurant are fried with onions, garlic, ginger and a dash of dark soya sauce.
FLASH-FRIED: The Fallopian tubes at Old Mother Hen Seafood Restaurant are fried with onions, garlic, ginger and a dash of dark soya sauce.
FLASH-FRIED: The Fallopian tubes at Old Mother Hen Seafood Restaurant are fried with onions, garlic, ginger and a dash of dark soya sauce.

When The New Paper on Sunday was at Old Geylang to give crocodile paw a try, restaurant director Catherine Ong was initially hesitant for the place to be featured.

She shares how a man stormed into the restaurant at Lorong 23 Geylang last year and chided customers for eating turtle soup. He berated the diners, asking how they could bear to eat the dish, obviously disgusted with it.

But turtle is a common dish throughout Asia, and many restaurants in Singapore serve it.

Meat here can be imported only from Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority-approved sources that have met public health and food safety standards.

The incident speaks volumes about how food can be a polarising subject.

Take the Yulin Dog Meat Festival in China's south-west that has enraged the global community, many angry over the Chinese eating dog meat.

According to animal welfare activists, up to 10,000 dogs were slaughtered for the festival.

It has earned the ire of Westerners who tend to see Chinese cuisine as barbaric, catalysing their revulsion.

But we have seen stranger food served.

In Singapore, there is crocodile meat. Uncle William's Shop, the retail outlet for Lian Wah Hang Farm, sells crocodile meat on bone for $28.80 per kg according to its website.

FAMILIAR LANDS, STRANGE FOOD

The Taiwanese have figured a way of deep-frying a fish while keeping it alive. It is served with its gills and mouth still moving - as proof of its freshness.

The beating heart of a snake is served with a shot of rice wine in Vietnam.

In Italy, there is a cheese known as Casu Marzu that is left out in the open for flies to lay eggs in. The resulting maggots that grow are eaten with the rotten cheese.In the US, Rocky Mountain oysters - deep-fried bull, pig or sheep's testicles - are commonly eaten.

Exotic dishes such as snake wine or edible insects can no longer be found here, but there are strange dishes still waiting to be devoured.

The TNPS team hunts down four of them - deer penis soup, fried Fallopian tubes, stewed crocodile paw and live octopus - that can still be eaten here.


Pig out on these tasty tubes

On the menu of Old Mother Hen Seafood Restaurant is "Famous Pig's Intestines".

But it is not intestines, as restaurant manager Jimmy Chen, 37, tells The New Paper on Sunday in Mandarin.

It is pig's Fallopian tubes.

This a pair of tubes along which eggs travel from the ovaries to the uterus in any female mammal.

Old Mother Hen imports its supply mainly from the UK.

Pig's intestines and innards are not exotic food here. But pig's Fallopian tubes are.

A plate of this fried zi char costs $10. The eatery has been offering it since it opened about 10 years ago.

Mr Chen says the dish is popular with locals, hence the word "famous" in their menu.

I have no problems eating pig's intestines and liver.

But the idea of Fallopian tubes sounds unpalatable.

Like intestines, it does not have much nutritional value.

But Mr Chen says: "Customers order it as it tastes good, not because it's healthy."

The fried Fallopian tubes arrive at the table within five minutes of ordering.

They are fried with onions, garlic, ginger and a dash of dark soya sauce.

All the ingredients are combined in a piping hot wok and flash-fried.

The result is a dish that is fragrant with the scent of onions, garlic and soya sauce.

SOFT AND JUICY

The meat is soft and juicy. It feels just like a pig's ear or duck's tongue when you bite into it.

It becomes unsavoury only when you think about which part of the animal you are eating.

But why should it be?

It is just another type of innards to add to the long list animal parts we already eat.

Oh deer, is it really good for manhood?

Premium content not available

Pages