Tim Howard: Immortalised in meme

Goalkeeper Tim Howard of the U.S. eyes the ball after a save from Belgium's Kevin Mirallas during their 2014 World Cup round of 16 game at the Fonte Nova arena.

Belgium needed extra time to defeat USA  in their last 16 match on Tuesday (Jul 2), just.

USA goalkeeper Tim Howard put on an epic performance that frustrated the Belgians for majority of the match.

In fact, he made a grand total of 16 saves, going into the record books as the most number of saves ever made by a goalkeeper on record in a World Cup match.

He was rewarded with the Man of the Match award after the game but perhaps even more significant was that the Internet has decreed that his performance is meme worthy.

We dutifully present to you some of them.


Twiter screengrab: @NOTSportsCenter


Twitter screengrab: @WorldCupPosts


Twitter screengrab: @FootyHumour


Twitter screengrab: GeneralBoles


Twitter screengrab: @CenterLebron


Twitter screengrab: @espn


Twitter screengrab: @CloydRivers.


Twitter screengrab: @Darth

 

 

Teen tries to stage own kidnap, gets caught instead

An 18-year-old teenager got his friend to call his mother and told her her son had been kidnapped by a group of men and demand for RM2,000 ($778).

The caller claimed the teen boy had stolen a motorcycle and would only be released when the money was paid to the "kidnappers".

The boy's 34-year-old mother reported the case to Kota Kinabalu police past 1am, about four hours after she received the call on June 25.

Barely 11/2 hours later, police found the boy roaming the streets with his two friends aged 17 and 23. All three were arrested. 

 

Source: The Star

Video: Man seen saving dog during Brazilian floods

In this video, a man is seen leaning precariously over the edge of a flooded river bank, trying to hook what looks like a piece of wire fashioned into a hoop over something.

That something later turns out to be a dog, stuck in a hole just above the rushing river water. 

The man then manages to lift the dog from the river bank.

The video description states that it was shot in Brazil.

Source: YouTube

Tags: dog, flood and Saving

VIDEO: How did this man make a snake slither out of his nostril?

This Chinese snake charmer stuffs a snake into his mouth and then somehow pulls it out of his nostrils.

In the description of the video, the snake charmer is identified as a Liu Yuanfei, and is said to have been living with snakes for over 30 years. 

But we still want to know: Why would anyone do such a thing?

And also - how does one learn to do such a trick?

Watch and squirm for yourself. 

Source: YouTube

 

Tags: Snake and youtube

Why some urban legends go viral

Urban legends get around, but we don’t really understand why. A study was conducted by a PhD candidate at Durham University to explain how misinformation spreads surprisingly fast and why people feel compelled to share it.

There are many urban legends and often they can fill us with horror. You may well have heard the story about the two people who have cyber-sex only to realise months later, when they meet, that they are father and daughter.

Or what about the girl who keeps her heavily hair-sprayed beehive so high, never washing or taking it down, until one day she suddenly drops dead only for doctors to find that a poisonous spider had nested in her hair before biting and killing her?

Then there’s the story about the woman who hears a baby crying outside her house in the middle of the night. She calls the police, only to be warned not to open her door because a serial killer is luring women this way.

These examples are a form of contemporary folklore, which are told as true and are set in post-industrial settings. They are passed on by word of mouth, through text messages, chain e-mails and Facebook posts, and in that process they evolve and thrive.

Some of them have even inspired horror films. Take the classic slasher “Candyman,” based on the widespread urban legend “Bloody Mary,” which says that calling out their name five times in the mirror makes the ghost-like figure appear.

There have been others, such as the less successful “Urban Legends” film series. A number of Web sites, most notably snopes.com, are dedicated to their collection and analysis.

Biases in our cognition

While many of us regard urban legends as just a bit of harmless fun, they can sometimes have negative consequences on individuals and communities, spreading fear and mistrust. For instance, a Chinese restaurant in Doncaster recently faced bankruptcy after a local urban legend spread that a customer had choked on a microchip from a retired racing greyhound cooked up in a dish.

But what is it about urban legends that make them so culturally successful? In a paper recently published in the British Journal of Psychology, based on work I conducted at Durham University with Jamie Tehrani and Emma Flynn, we examined the idea that the success of urban legends can be explained by the way our brains evolved to learn, remember and transmit certain types of (mis)information more readily than others. Their success could be explained by two key biases in our cognition.

Our minds fall for simple biases

The first suggests that we evolved to notice and remember information about our environment that is important for our survival. The second suggests that we evolved greater intelligence in order to keep track of social interactions and relationships. These hypotheses suggest that we are evolved to be disposed to social and survival information, leaving us susceptible to notice, remember and pass on stories that contain this information, even if it does not reflect reality.

To examine how these cognitive biases might influence how urban legends are passed on from one person to another, our study used a design in the vein of “Chinese Whispers,” the children’s game in which information is passed from one child to another by whispering in their ears only once. By the time the information has reached the end child, it has invariably changed.

We gave participants urban legends that contained social information, survival information or a combination of both, who read and then wrote down these stories from memory. The product of their recall was given to the next participant and this process was repeated down the chain.

Another set of participants was presented with a number of “headlines” based on urban legends and asked which stories they would prefer to read. After reading each story they were asked which stories they would be more likely to pass on to another person.

The results

People matter more than the environment.

The study showed two things. First, people were attracted to stories that contained survival threats and social relationships. They were also likely to pass them both on to another person. Second, and this is more important, urban legends that contained social information, such as that in the cybersex legend, or combined survival information with social information, such as that in the baby-crying legend, were more successfully remembered than those that only involved survival information, such as that in the spider-in-the-hair legend.

This supports the theory that human intelligence and memory primarily evolved to deal with the challenges of living in large social groups with complex relationships, rather than dealing with the challenges posed by our environment, which is a commonly held view. They also help explain why urban legends can be found that involve both social interaction and survival threats.

We are attracted to both types of information and willing to pass both types of story on, but stories that contain social information live longer in our memory. It also helps to explain why so many stories – not just urban legends but also traditional folklore, novels, soap operas and internet memes – are about families, factions, friendships and fallings-out as well as death and disease.

- Washington Post

Hero uses bare hands to free driver from burning SUV

Renning bent open the top of the passenger door, cleared the shattered glass from the window and pulled Johannes to safety
Renning bent open the top of the passenger door, cleared the shattered glass from the window and pulled Johannes to safety
Michael Johannes was saved by Bob Renning who pried open his car door.
Michael Johannes was saved by Bob Renning who pried open his car door.
Bob Renning saved Michael Johannes by prying open his car door.
Bob Renning saved Michael Johannes by prying open his car door.

A Minnesota man used his bare hands to pry open a passenger-side door of a burning sport utility vehicle and save a trapped motorist from near-certain death.

The incident has left police marveling at the actions of Bob Renning, 52, who - apparently fueled by a burst of adrenaline - pried open the door of Minneapolis resident Michael Johannes's 2006 Chevrolet TrailBlazer on Sunday evening.

Renning was driving along an interstate freeway in the evening when he noticed the SUV on fire in a suburb north of Minneapolis, Roeske said.

After motioning for Johannes to pull over, Renning approached the burning vehicle, Roeske said.

Heroic

Johannes, 51, tried to get out on his own, but the electrical system was disabled and he could not unlock the doors, Roeske said.

That is when Renning bent open the top of the passenger door, cleared the shattered glass from the window and pulled Johannes to safety, Roeske said. Soon after, the truck was entirely engulfed in flames.

Johannes escaped the incident with minor injuries, and the cause of the fire is not yet clear, Roeske said.

"To say his actions were heroic would be putting it lightly," said Lieutenant Eric Roeske, spokesman for the Minnesota State Patrol. "He almost certainly saved Mr. Johannes from a horrible death."​

- Reuters

Pistorius trial: 'screams' heard during shooting

Olympian Oscar Pistorius (R) is on trial for murdering late girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp (L).
Olympian Oscar Pistorius (R) is on trial for murdering late girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp (L).
Olympian Oscar Pistorius is on trial for murdering late girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.
Olympian Oscar Pistorius is on trial for murdering late girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.
South African Olympic and Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius sits in the dock during his trial in the North Gauteng High Court in Pretoria, July 1, 2014. Photo: Reuters
South African Olympic and Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius sits in the dock during his trial in the North Gauteng High Court in Pretoria, July 1, 2014. Photo: Reuters

The murder trial of South African Paralympian Oscar Pistorius turned its focus on Tuesday to whether neighbours could have heard his model girlfriend screaming on the night he shot her dead. 

Prosecutors are trying to prove that Reeva Steenkamp screamed and that this showed the star athlete known as the “Blade Runner” knowingly gunned her down in a fit of anger after a row in the early hours of Valentine’s Day last year. 

The defence claims Pistorius shot the 29-year-old model and law graduate four times through a locked toilet door after mistaking her for an intruder and that any screams came from him. 

State prosecutor Gerrie Nel attempted to show that tests conducted by engineer and acoustics expert Ivan Lin backed up the premeditated murder charge, arguing that neighbours who lived 177 metres from Pistorius could have been able to differentiate between a male and a female screaming. 

Lin said on Monday that at 177 metres away “it is very unlikely a listener can hear a scream let alone interpret the sound source reliably”. 

But Nel insisted that Lin, a carefully spoken man in black-framed glasses, failed to do his sound estimates properly, saying he did not take into account factors that would have made it possible for the neighbours to clearly hear Steenkamp. 

“We have four people identifying the sound of a woman’s voice, we have no exceptions,” Nel said.  “I do believe they heard a sound but I cannot say whether they were correct or incorrect. It’s not for me to interpret that,” said Lin. 

Nel asked Lin if he thought the state’s witnesses were lying. “Not at all,” he replied. 

The defence then called Pistorius’s longtime manager Pete Van Zyl, who described Pistorius having a “heightened sense of awareness” and being fearful of crime but rarely aggressive. 

“I can recall only two specific instances where Pistorius lost his temper, I would not call it aggressive,” said Van Zyl, a tan man with a grey buzz cut wearing a grey suit with a purple tie. 

Van Zyl also said Pistorius, who was at the height of his career following the 2012 London Olympic Games, wanted to involve Steenkamp in his life more than any other girlfriend. 

“I would describe it as a loving and caring relationship,” said Van Zyl.  The testimony appeared to strain Pistorius, who started wiping his face with his hands.

- AFP

Bombing? World Cup's more pressing

Fighting continues as the World Cup enters the knock out stage
Fighting continues as the World Cup enters the knock out stage.
Fighting continues as World Cup 2014 gets underway
Fighting continues as World Cup 2014 gets underway

He sits glued to a television in a Baghdad cafe, anxious over the dual concerns of his team trailing in a World Cup match and the danger of bombings.

Raad Abdulhussein sits quietly with three friends in the “Facebook” cafe, the silence only broken by shouts or clapping when the Netherlands advance toward Mexico’s goal.

tcNaAs on Make A Gif, Animated Gifs

“Football brings us together,” says Raad, a 30-year-old taxi driver. Due to the time difference, the matches are broadcast in the evening in Iraq.

This year’s World Cup comes as security in Iraq worsens. Sunni militants led by the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group overran parts of five provinces in a lightning offensive that Iraqi soldiers and police are struggling to contain.

Cafes are especially dangerous places, as militants often target them and other places where crowds of people gather, including markets and mosques.

Source: Reuters

Susan Lim's hubby: Lawyers overcharged us

Dr Susan Lim and hubby vs S'pore Medical Council lawyers
Dr Susan Lim and hubby vs S'pore Medical Council lawyers

The husband of surgeon Susan Lim, found guilty of overcharging her wealthy Bruneian patient, now accuses lawyers of overcharging her.

She lost her fight against the Singapore Medical Council (SMC) last year, after a court overturned Dr Lim's appeal.

Now, her husband, who is funding her case, is accusing SMC's lawyers of "grossly overcharging my wife by $637,009", The Business Times reported.

The medical watchdog's lawyers from Wong Partnership had submitted a bill of costs for about $1 million. Dr Lim then disputed the amount, which was eventually reduced to about $370,000.

Dr Susan Lim and hubby vs S'pore Medical Council lawyers

Overcharging claims - Dr Susan Lim and hubby vs Singapore Medical Council lawyers. PHOTO: The New Paper

Her husband, Deepak Sharma, then complained to the Law Society of Singapore, saying that the lawyers' actions were "dishonourable and constitute grossly improper conduct". 

A review committee dismissed part of his complaint.

He is now challenging the decision and asking for a judicial review.

He is also applying for well-known Queen's Counsel Michael Fordham to represent him - after over 20 Singapore Senior Counsel turned him down.

Source: The Business Times

Man slits 4-year-old nephew's throat

A 23-year-old man lured his 4-year-old nephew to the back his mother's restaurant as the rest of the family were preparing to break their fast then slit his throat. 

The boy died from his injuries. 

The incident happened on Monday (June 30) evening at a town called Telupid, about 195km from Kota Kinabalu in Malaysia. 

Mohamad Khairul Aize Abdullah had been playing alone when his paternal uncle beckoned the little boy to the back of the restaurant owned by his mother. 

The uncle then slit the boy's throat with a knife, believed to be a meat cleaver

The Mohd Khairul's screams alerted his mother, who rushed him to the hospital but it was too late. He was pronounced dead. 

The uncle, who has not been named, is believed to be of unsound mind.

Police have arrested the man.

Source: The Star

 

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