Belgium thwarts returning jihadists' attack plans

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White House evacuated after man jumps fence

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Aceh proposes 100 lashes for gay sex and adultery

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Accreditation scheme to help parents choose the best pre-schools

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PM Lee spells out how to address income inequality

Singapore Summit conference

DIALOGUE:PM Lee at the Singapore Summit conference yesterday.
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Confessions of a landscape designer

Mr Eliam Eng (above).

Mr Eliam Eng is a landscape designer to clients who think nothing of spending six-figure sums on their gardens, which sometimes feature Japanese bonsai costing up to $70,000 each.

But the executive director of family business Nyee Phoe Flower Garden prefers to introduce himself as a simple gardener.

Occasionally, customers turn the gardens he designed into "rojak" by adding flora and fauna of their own, without consulting him.

When that happens, he feels sad but has to let go. After all, the home owner is always right, he says.

Read the full report in our print edition on Sept 21.

Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

Schooled at home but got into NUS

Jeremiah Tan (above), 17, attained the advanced version of the International Certificate of Christian Education (ICCE), but both the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) initially rejected his application.
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Back to mainstream schools

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What is homeschooling?

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Only 1 in 3 homeschool kids fail to meet MOE benchmark at PSLE

No degree, no worries, reckons one parent

PURSUING PASSIONS: (From left, back row): Isaiah, Isaac, Mrs Ong Suwei, Abigail, Mr Dan Ong, Asher, (front row) Michaela and Magdalena, in their five-room flat at Yishun.
TOGETHER: The family does much of its studying at a table in front of a mural they painted.

While their peers trudge to class with heavy school bags, the Ong brood of six enjoy pursuing their own interests like a variety of musical instruments, singing, and sewing.

All because their parents have decided to educate them in their home in Yishun instead of sending them to mainstream schools.

The Ong children also focus on academics, but get to learn at their own pace and set their own goals for the day.

Last week, the MOE announced that homeschooled children have to take a new test when they are at the Primary 4 level, to gauge their progress. The New Paper on Sunday finds out if the homeschooling journey is as idyllic as it sounds.

Read the full report in our print edition on Sept 21.

Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

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