Wake up & smell...

...the difference between traditional and modern ways of coffee roasting

'Old School'. TRADITIONAL: Mr Chua preparing a batch of beans to roast. (Above) He spreads out a freshly roasted batch of beans on a metal tray to cool them down.
TRADITIONAL: (Above) Mr Chua preparing a batch of beans to roast. He spreads out a freshly roasted batch of beans on a metal tray to cool them down.
HANDS-ON: (Above) Mr Chua uses a small magnet in his palm to sieve through the beans for impurities. Once the roasted beans have cooled down, they are transferred to plastic-lined tins.
HANDS-ON: Mr Chua uses a small magnet in his palm to sieve through the beans for impurities. (Above) Once the roasted beans have cooled down, they are transferred to plastic-lined tins.
'New Age'. NEW: (Above) The state-of-the-art coffee roasting set-up at Dutch Colony Coffee. A scanner is used to measure the darkness of the roast, which affects the flavour of the beans.
NEW: The state-of-the-art coffee roasting set-up at Dutch Colony Coffee. (Above) A scanner is used to measure the darkness of the roast, which affects the flavour of the beans.
SCIENTIFIC: (Above) Every once in a while, Mr Nazrul uses a coffee tryer to inspect the colour and smell of the beans. Mr Nazrul gets a whiff of the freshly roasted coffee beans while waiting for them to cool down.
scientific: Every once in a while, Mr Nazrul uses a coffee tryer to inspect the colour and smell of the beans. (Above) Mr Nazrul gets a whiff of the freshly roasted coffee beans while waiting for them to cool down.
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Boy, 3, dies after torture by mum, boyfriend

Scott McMillan.
Jillian Tait.
Gary Fellenbaum.
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Students shot at trash dump, burned by cartel

Fate of 43 missing trainee teachers in Mexico revealed

IN MEMORY: The garbage dump where remains were found. (Above) Portraits of some of the 43 missing students being placed as students protest outside the Mexican Embassy in Bogota on Friday.
IN MEMORY: (Above) The garbage dump where remains were found. Portraits of some of the 43 missing students being placed as students protest outside the Mexican Embassy in Bogota on Friday.
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Many still missing loved ones

Typhoon Haiyan anniversary

GRIEF: A woman weeping at the grave of her husband and their three children who perished during the onslaught of Typhoon Haiyan last year.
REMEMBERANCE: (Above) A child and his father during a memorial ceremony at a mass grave in Tacloban City.
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Dam fears mean sleepless nights

Cameron Highlands floods

FULL: Aerial view of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam, which releases water from Ringlet river to Ringlet and Bertam Valley.
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Confessions of a money changer: Elaborate plans are in place when we transport money

To avoid unwanted attention, they stuff wads of cash in their clothes.

They also drive on busy roads to avoid being alone, just so that they can deliver the currencies to the money changer safely.

These are some of the methods that money changers use while transporting large amounts of cash, says Mr Mohamed Rafeeq, the owner of Clifford Gems & Money Exchange at Raffles City shopping centre.

But the risks aren't the only difficulties he and his staff face.

"Stinky notes are the worst," says the 49-year-old, laughing.

Read the full report in our print edition on Nov 9. Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop


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Walk with us

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Walk for a good cause

WALKERS: Mr Alwyn Chia (second from left) and his colleagues from the Lions Befrienders will be at The New Paper Big Walk with their beneficiaries.

Their work - and those they help - often go unnoticed.

We are talking about volunteers and their frail, lonely and underprivileged elderly beneficiaries in Singapore.

But come Nov 30, not only will the beneficiaries and the volunteers' selfless efforts be appreciated, but they will be celebrated.

The Lions Befrienders Service Association, along with their beneficiaries, will take a breather from their Sunday routine to join thousands in The New Paper Big Walk, courtesy of the Singapore Turf Club.

TNP Big Walk presenters Singapore Turf Club will cover the registration fees for the voluntary welfare organisation.

Founded in 1994, Lions Befrienders provides friendship and care for lonely senior citizens. Staff and volunteers befriend and help the elderly through home visits.

Lions Befrienders also caters to the social and physical needs of the lonely elderly through activities such as exercise and games at Senior Activity Centres at various housing estates.

Mr Simon Leong, Singapore Turf Club's vice-president, corporate services, says the sponsored tickets will help support the less privileged and make the TNP Big Walk more inclusive.

"Besides being the presenter for this year, we are happy to support the less privileged among us as well as those who are helping them so they, too, can enjoy this fun Walk with their family and friends.

"By having them in the Walk, the event will truly be for the community and for everyone."

Among those who will benefit from the initiative is Mr Alwyn Chia, 41.

Mr Chia, who has been working at Lions Befrienders for about six years, said that the TNP Big Walk is a good opportunity for the staff and volunteers at Lions Befrienders to bond.

"It will provide an opportunity for like-minded staff and volunteers to come and do something together outside the workplace."

Mr Goh Boo Han, 73, the executive director of Lions Befrienders, feels that charities can leverage on the TNP Big Walk to build awareness about their causes.

He said: "I feel that the Big Walk is a good platform to build public awareness for charities and their worthy social causes."Companies wishing to register beneficiaries of their adopted charities can do so at a special price of $12 instead of $15.

To register, please write to us at enquiry@tnpbigwalk.sg

Kids staying in school after hitting the bars (the bars in the neighbourhood's fitness corner, that is)

HANGIN' TOUGH: Mr Firdaus Fidrisha (middle) started the fitness group four years ago. Here, he is joined by Hazwan Hilmi Rahmat (left) and Mr Muhammad Azhari Sahar (right).
BODY ROCK: (Above) The group pushes each other to learn new tricks, which involve making use of body strength.
BODY ROCK:(Above) Mr Muhammad Azhari (left) and Mr Firdaus (right) show off a trick they have perfected on the poles.
Hazwan Hilmi Rahmat.

He is the reason why some of the teens and young adults around the Sembawang neighbourhood could be staying out of trouble.

But that doesn't mean Firdaus Fidrisha, 26, was always an angel.

With no interest in studies and preparing for his future, it took a road accident for Mr Firdaus to realise that life is short and that he needed to make the most of it.

What started as a regular workout session with his friend at a fitness corner near his home soon turned into a community group of fitness junkies who gather every Friday evening.

"This group has helped keep me busy and taken me away from other influences that could get me in trouble," says Hazwan Hilmi Rahmat, 17, an ITE College Central visual effects student.

Read the full report in our print edition on Nov 9.

Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

Time to accept ugly fruit?

OFFER: Mr Remy Chua, 42, who runs Avocado at Pasir Ris, says that he will try to sell the damaged fruits at a discount instead of throwing them away.

Finish your food, or your (future) spouse’s face will be pimply and pockmarked. It might have worked then but it certainly isn't working now.

Last year saw the biggest spike in wastage in recent years: Almost 800,000 tonnes of food.

Wet market stall holders already have their ways to minimise waste. They sell bruised fruit and vegetables cheaply, so sell to nearby cooked food stalls at cost price.

But will you buy knobbly fruit and wilted leaves? It takes a mindset change to waste not, want not, says Maureen Koh.

Read the full report in our print edition on November 9 (Sunday).

Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

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