Beware, bogus nun tries to raise funds

This happened back in 2007: People said no to this woman dressed as a nun when she tried soliciting donations at Hougang Avenue 5.

She was spotted asking for donations from the public in Johor on Tuesday (July 14).

The middle-aged nun was believed to be an imposter, reported Guang Ming Daily.

A resident saw the bogus nun carrying a note pad in a black sack. Her hair was covered under a beanie.

She reportedly claimed that she was from a cave temple in Perak now raising funds for orphans living at the temple.

A shop owner told her that he had not heard about nuns raising funds in Malaysia.

When he wanted to find out more about the temple before making any donation, she quickly left, he added.

A fake monk approaching tourists at the Singapore River. FILE PHOTO: STOMP

Fake monks going around to beg for money is becoming more prevalent in Malaysia and Singapore as well.

In 2013, after noticing a rising trend of such imposters, the Singapore Buddhist Federation called a press conference in 2013 to address the problem.

The fakes had been seen all over the island — from neighbourhoods such as Bukit Merah and Kreta Ayer to parts of town such as Clarke Quay, Raffles Place and Orchard Road.

The Buddhist leaders emphasised that monks are not allowed to ask for money using alms bowls and urged the public to call the police if they spot a bogus monk or nun.

According to media reports, a man who passed himself off as a Thai monk could get up to $2,000 in just a day selling religious trinkets and begging for money.

Here's how to spot the real from the fake:

 Appearance: Thai monks shave their eyebrows. Nuns do not put on any headwear.

 No sale: Monks and nuns will not sell items such as Buddha images, prayer beads or relics.

 No money: They will never beg for money in public.

 Time limit: Alms bowls are only for collecting food and medicine, and monks can do these only till 11am.

 Local: All monks based in Singapore do not go around with alms bowls asking for food and medicine.

 Foreign: Monks visiting Singapore from countries such as Thailand, Myanmar and Sri Lanka do sometimes go around asking for food and medicine. 

Sources: Star Online, Guang Ming Daily, The New Paper

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The statutes of world football governing body Fifa (13.1.(i) state that member associations are obliged to "manage their own affairs and ensure that their own affairs are not influenced by any third parties," under the threat of sanctions and suspension for violations. 

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Last updated in 2011, article 19.3 of the FAS constitution states that "all council members shall be appointed by the Minister for Community Development, Youth and Sports (the former name of the current Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth (MCCY)) - including the president - "and shall, unless otherwise decided by the Minister, hold office for a period of two years".  

Incumbent FAS president Zainudin Nordin, who is a member of parliament for Bishan-Toa Payoh GRC, has held the role for three consecutive two-year terms since 2009. 

Lim Kia Tong, FAS vice-president and deputy chairman of Fifa's disciplinary committee, believes that the Singapore situation is distinctly different. 

Read the full report in our print edition on July 16.

Subscribe to The New Paper, now available in print and digital, at http://bit.ly/tnpeshop.

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