Racing

Werther makes it a one-horse affair

Moore's star trounces rivals in Group 1 Champions & Chater Cup at Sha Tin

WERTHER delivered a timely reminder of his significant abilities at Sha Tin on Sunday with a clear-cut victory in the HK$10 million (S$1.77 million) Standard Chartered Champions & Chater Cup, Hong Kong's final Group 1 race this term.

"He's back to his best. That was a fair test and he's put them away quite easily in the end," said trainer John Moore after Hong Kong's reigning Horse of the Year had stormed three lengths clear of six rivals for a first score over the 2,400m trip.

Stablemate Basic Trilogy ensured a sound tempo in the race, cutting out the running from two-time winner Blazing Speed. Werther parked a stalking third, his usual blinkers abandoned and cruise control engaged under Hugh Bowman.

"That was all class," said Moore. The race was run to suit everybody and Hugh was able to get the horse into a nice rhythm. The key factor, too, was taking the blinkers off. When Hugh spoke to me a few weeks back he said, 'Would you consider taking the blinkers off?' and I said, 'Done'. I didn't even think about it, the blinkers just came off."

His vision unfettered, the Tavistock gelding ranged widest upsides Basic Trilogy and Blazing Speed on the final turn.

Blazing Speed's jockey Neil Callan, aware of the threat to his left flank, began punching for home on last year's winner. Bowman remained unruffled. Werther's momentum had already edged the lead by the time the Australian decided to muster and drive.

Runner-up Blazing Speed hung on to his tail until the 200m point but that final 200m belonged to Werther, the bay extending clear to clock 2min 29.26sec (a storming 22.33sec for the final 400m).

"Although my gut feeling was that 2,400m was probably beyond his premium distance, I think he proved today that he's got no drama with it, as long as he can relax within himself, and he was able to do it this afternoon with the blinkers off," said Bowman, who was registering a 15th win at the highest level since partnering Werther to glory in the April, 2016 Audemars Piguet QEII Cup (2,000m).

The five-year-old, second pick in the market at 3.0, sign-posted Sunday's performance when running a half-length third to Neorealism in last month's QEII Cup, an admirable effort given that the New Zealand-bred finished that race with blood in his trachea.

"He was aided today by a horse that went a nice, even gallop in front - something that he didn't receive last start in the QEII, it was a very slowly run race that day and he was inclined to over-race with me," said Bowman.

Moore was fairly confident, heading into Sunday's test, that the 2016 BMW Hong Kong Derby (2,000m) hero would hand him a sixth victory in the race and a first since Mighty High in 2011.

"He worked with an inferior horse the other day and he did it just so kindly. The riding boy got off and said, 'Boss, he's ready to win'," said Moore.

"The blinkers will stay off now. I won't be tempted to put them back on."

Sunday's win was Werther's second from a light, five-race campaign that began at the end of January.

With February's Group 1 Hong Kong Gold Cup (2,000m) also in the bag, Moore's stable star ends his campaign with wins in the last two legs of the Hong Kong Triple Crown series, and is one of only two horses, alongside stablemate Helene Paragon - first leg winner in the Stewards' Cup - to land two Group 1 victories at Sha Tin this term.

Time will tell, but in a tight year with no dominant force following the loss of the outstanding four-year-old Rapper Dragon, Werther has re-entered calculations for Horse of the Year honours.

After that, Moore is looking to December's LONGINES Hong Kong International Races, and Sunday's blinker-less win at the extended trip has widened the scope for a horse that was officially rated fifth-best in the world last year.

"That's opened up options," said Moore. We'll look at giving him an entry in the Hong Kong Cup (2,000m) and the Hong Kong Vase (2,400m) at the international meeting in December. We'll see what the fields are like, the competition, and how the horse is, fitness-wise, leading into those races." - HKJC