Health

Cleaner air in the home

Indoor air quality is not as good as you think, but it can be improved

Amid relaxed, easy-listening music and the soothing instructions of model and television host Denise Keller, participants inhaled and exhaled as they bent and stretched in different poses at Philips World Yoga Day.

Held on July 7, the event brought together yoga enthusiasts, pregnant women and asthma and allergy sufferers at the Philips APAC Center as they executed vinyasa flows.

Breath is an essential component of yoga and what made this yoga session different was the controlled, clean indoor air environment that the attendees practised in, thanks to the new Philips Air Purifier Series 3000i — 16 of them stationed beside the exercise area.

Yoga participants practised in clean, purified air thanks to the 16 Philips Air Purifier Series 3000i at the exercise area.PHOTO: PHILIPS SINGAPORE

“The air we breathe is critical to our overall health. At Philips, we aim to empower consumers to take charge of their health by combining our expertise in healthcare technology with consumer insights to develop meaningful and innovative product solutions for a healthier future. We are glad to be able to bring different people from so many walks of life together, to participate in a meaningful healthy activity like yoga, and to learn how to improve the quality of the air we breathe,” said Mr. Nicholas Lee, General Manager, Personal Health, Philips ASEAN Pacific

Model, television host and yogi Denise Keller was the instructor for the event. PHOTO: PHILIPS SINGAPORE

Clean? Think again

The average person inhales up to 14kg of air every day through 24,000 breaths, and a common misconception is that outdoor air is worse than indoor air.

Seven out of 10 Singaporeans are aware that poor indoor air quality affects their health, with July to September rated as the worst months, according to a Healthy Air Survey commissioned by Philips.

In fact, indoor air is two to five times more polluted than outdoor air in Singapore, with top pollutants being dust mites, viruses and bacteria. Pregnant women, asthma and allergy sufferers are more affected by poor air quality.

 

The survey also found that while air quality is a concern for 77 per cent of those surveyed, less than 50 per cent sought medical attention for chronic respiratory conditions.

Asthma is also a common chronic disease among children, and it is triggered by allergens such as mold spores, dust mites, pollen and bacteria.

But you don’t have to live with such allergens — there are devices to remove them, such as air purifiers.

 

Good air quality starts at home

The good news is, we can control the air at home.

For instance, Philips Air Purifier Series 3000i (AC3259/30), the brand’s latest release, helps you do just that.

 
The Philips Air Purifier Series 3000i (AC3259/30) is the latest in air purifiers from the brand, which comes with an app that allows you to control the air at home anywhere. PHOTO: PHILIPS SINGAPORE

The smart air purifier has an AeraSense sensing technology that allows the machine to monitor slight changes in the air and automatically boost the air purifier to reduce the level of airborne particles.

It is fitted with a VitaShield IPS multi-layer filtration technology to remove 99.7 per cent of airborne particles. Air then is passed through filters to remove particles as small as 0.02 nanometres.

According to Philips’ tests, the air purifier effectively removes 99.99 per cent of house dust mite allergens and ultrafine particles as small as three nanometers, more than 800 times smaller than PM2.5.

And with the accompanying Air Matters app, you can monitor the level of PM2.5 particles and Indoor Allergen Index in real-time and regulate the settings and speed of the air purifier from anywhere in your home.

In a Philips’ clinical survey, it was found that 83% of Singaporeans experienced cleaner and healthier air using the Philips Air Purifier. 
To breathe healthier air, the Philips Air Purifier Series 3000i is available for purchase here.
 

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