Singapore

88-year-old cleaner one of two new community cases

There were two Covid-19 community cases yesterday - one unlinked and another linked to the Pasir Panjang Terminal cluster.

The unlinked case is a fully vaccinated cleaner who works at Changi Airport Terminal 3, said the Ministry of Health (MOH).

The 88-year-old Singaporean has not returned to work since he started having a runny nose and cough on Tuesday.

The cleaner, who is employed by Ramky Cleantech Services, sought medical treatment at a general practitioner clinic where he was tested for Covid-19.

His test result returned positive on Wednesday, and he was taken to Sengkang General Hospital.

His earlier tests from rostered routine testing - the last being on April 16 - had all been negative.

The cleaner received his first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine on Jan 22 and the second dose on Feb 15.

His serological test result is pending.

NATIONAL SERVICEMAN

The second community case is a 22-year-old full-time national serviceman (NSF) with the Singapore Armed Forces, linked to the Pasir Panjang Terminal cluster.

This takes the total number of cases linked to the cluster - Singapore's newest - to five.

The permanent resident is a household contact of a 59-year-old trailer truck driver who was reported to have Covid-19 on Wednesday.

The NSF was quarantined on Tuesday after the trailer truck driver tested positive and was immediately isolated while at Sembawang Camp.

On Wednesday, he was tested for the virus even though he was asymptomatic. His test result came back positive the next day, and he was taken to Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital. His serology test result is negative.

The Ministry of Defence said yesterday SAF has "carried out immediate and thorough disinfection of the premises the serviceman had been in". 

This article first appeared in The Straits Times.


By the numbers

18 New cases

2 New cases in community 

16 Imported cases

120 In hospital 

29 Discharged yesterday

31 Deaths 

60858 Total recovered

61286 Total cases

coronavirus