Singapore

Pink Dot marks 10th anniversary tomorrow

This article is more than 12 months old

Pink Dot Singapore, an annual event that supports the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) community, celebrates its 10th anniversary this year.

There was a turnout of 20,000 people last year and a similar number is expected at Hong Lim Park for their annual celebration tomorrow.

A Pink Dot spokesman who has been volunteering since its inauguration, Mr Paerin Choa, 41, said they have faced challenges along the way, including vocal groups that oppose the movement.

These include the Wear White movement, established in 2014. It is a religious coalition that shows its opposition by wearing white on the event day.

Another vocal entity is a Facebook group called We Are Against Pink Dot (WAAPD), which has almost 6,800 members. On July 16, it called on members to wear white tomorrow.

Last year, WAAPD complained to the Advertising Standards Authority of Singapore about Pink Dot advertisements at Cathay Cineleisure.

Pink Dot also had to deal with changes in policy regarding donations and funding.

In 2016, foreign firms were barred from sponsoring or supporting the movement. Last year, changes to the Public Order Act also meant their annual event would no longer be open to foreigners.

There were 120 sponsors through the Red Dot for Pink Dot fund-raising campaign last year, and 113 sponsors this year.

Some companies are returning as sponsors this year, including The Lo & Behold Group, a hospitality company which donated $15,000 over two years.

Its spokesman said: "We believe in cultivating diversity and acceptance which is very much aligned with the causes that Pink Dot is championing."

One of Red Dot for Pink Dot's campaign founders, Mr Darius Cheung, 37, the chief executive officer of 99.co, a property search portal, told TNP: "(The sponsorships) send a strong signal that businesses in Singapore remain relentless and tireless in their quest to forge an inclusive and diverse landscape."

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