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More information needed ahead of new restrictions on PMD use

I refer to recent articles in The New Paper about personal mobility devices (PMDs).

It is obvious that the vast majority of PMD users are responsible and adhere to regulations and common sense when using the device.

Most use it as a last-mile transport solution, for short trips involving errands and visits in the neighbourhood, or recreationally, in parks and only on weekends.

It is regrettable that the authorities feel the need to add yet more restrictive regulations because of a minority of irresponsible users.

Bringing forward the UL 2272 certification requirement from Jan 1, 2021, to April next year may cause inconvenience and monetary losses to law-abiding users who earlier had the assurance that their PMDs can be used till the end of next year.

Can the authorities provide a breakdown showing the brands and models of the e-scooters that caught fire?

I have yet to see this information published. Judging by the photos that appear in news reports, it seems that most PMDs that have caught fire are cheaper brands using inferior batteries.

Similarly, are those involved in accidents predominantly service providers, such as those delivering food, or couriers? Do these people fall within a certain age group?

Instead of painting all PMD users with the same brush, those who break the law and hurt our fellow citizens should be given the punishment that fits the crime.

Finally, how was it that importers and retailers were allowed to bring in and sell these PMDs?

Was it not possible to have some oversight by enforcement agencies at an earlier stage?

We are famed for taking pre-emptive actions before new and emerging negative trends set in. Would not the PMD trend, which started overseas, with its attendant problems, have been picked up and known in the departments concerned?

I hope the relevant authorities can give us more information on this issue.

Transport