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Trump gains more Latino support in Florida, Texas: Exit polls

But US President has lost some support among white males and older voters in toss-up states

WASHINGTON US President Donald Trump showed some surprising gains with Latino and other non-white voters, but they may have been offset by losses among those who supported him four years ago, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research.

Here are some highlights from the polls, based on in-person interviews with voters on Tuesday, in-person interviews at early voting centres before election day and telephone interviews with people who voted by mail.

Mr Trump won both Florida and Texas over Democratic opponent Joe Biden in part because of newfound support from Latino voters.

In Florida, according to exit polls, Mr Trump and Mr Biden split the Latino vote. In 2016, Mr Trump only won four out of 10 Latino voters in his race against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

Overall, he was winning three of 10 non-white voters versus winning just two of 10 four years ago.

Mr Trump maintained his advantage among white voters in Florida. According to Edison Research exit polls, six in 10 white voters said they cast ballots for Mr Trump, unchanged from 2016.

In Texas, four in 10 Hispanics voted for Mr Trump, up from three in 10 in 2016, according to exit polls in that state.

Edison's national exit poll showed that while Mr Biden led Mr Trump among non-white voters, Mr Trump had received a slightly higher proportion of the non-white vote than he did in 2016.

The poll showed that about 11 per cent of black people, 31 per cent of Hispanics and 30 per cent of Asian Americans voted for Mr Trump, up 3 percentage points from 2016 among all three groups.

The Republican President however appears to have lost some support among white men and some older voters in Georgia, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, according to Edison polls.

While Mr Trump is still winning the majority of those voters, some switched to supporting Mr Biden, the exit polls showed.

Mr Trump won all three states in 2016.

The poll found nine out of 10 voters had already decided whom to vote for before October, and nine out of 10 voters said they were confident that their state would accurately count votes. - REUTERS

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